idahokettlebells.com Blog

May 23, 2019

IKSC Weekly Link Blast May 23, 2019

IKSC Weekly Link Blast May 23, 2019

We do “abs” every day. It’s just that we do exercises that make your abs work with the rest of your body at the same time (like they’re supposed to work).
http://main.poliquingroup.com/Tips/tabid/130/EntryId/2308/THESE-are-the-Best-Bulletproof-Ab-Exercises-Squats-Deads-Chins-Olympic-Lifts.aspx

Good article on post-partum body image:
https://www.marksdailyapple.com/postpartum-body-image/

This is the reason I recommend a diet that is ancestrally based, which includes no processed foods.
http://www.ergo-log.com/how-ultra-processed-foods-make-you-fat.html

Exercise technique is slightly different for everyone depending on lots of things. A good coach can see what is safe and optimal for the individual, depending on their level of development.
https://www.t-nation.com/training/6-uncomfortable-thoughts-about-exercise-form

One of my favorite articles by Steve Maxwell. IKSC’s training philosophy closely resembles this perspective: https://www.maxwellsc.com/blog.cfm?blogID=125

Video of the week. This is a few years old, but it one of the best breakdowns of what goes on when you switch from using carbs for fuel and transition to using fat, or “go keto” as everyone likes to say now. It is also a reason why using things like urine strips are not that reliable. With all the faddish ketogenic diet stuff out there now, I try to think those of you at IKSC are at a little higher level of understanding on this topic. This is worth taking the time to sit down and watch.

May 9, 2019

IKSC Weekly Link Blast May 9, 2019

IKSC Weekly Link Blast May 9, 2019

May is Mental Health Awareness Month. Knowledge is increasing fast about the connection between the gut biome and mental health. Here is video from a lecture I was fortunate to attend last summer on this topic. NOTE: It is a far cry from the idiotic and insulting marketing campaign Burger King is doing right now exploiting the food/brain connection by packaging foods that are specifically noted to CONTRIBUTE to poor gut health.

Sleep. Here’s a good article from a few years back on ways to optimize your sleep time. We’ll do another class on it sometime.
https://robbwolf.com/2015/10/14/sleep-your-way-to-optimal-performance-in-just-7-days/

Is breakfast important? Who said it was the most important meal of the day? I haven’t eaten a “breakfast” in a long time, but if you are going eat early, skip the carbs. That means no cereals, muffins, etc. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/fullarticle/2732831

A good article on insulin’s role.
https://www.t-nation.com/diet-fat-loss/insulin-advantage

What media articles don’t point out about the studies relating meat and cancer.
https://www.marksdailyapple.com/red-meat-colon-cancer/

The conversation around stretching changes every few years, but a constant is that stretching immediately prior to training is mostly useless and just makes you weak and even prone to injury. What is more important is to have strength throughout your full range. http://main.poliquingroup.com/ArticlesMultimedia/Articles/Article/2788/Facts_and_Fibs_About_Stretching.aspx

Don’t throw away the salt shaker if you’re worried about high blood pressure. Cut the carbs and sugar.
https://www.diabetes.co.uk/in-depth/high-blood-pressure-excess-sugar-diet-may-culprit/

June 25, 2014

“How much protein should I eat?”


“How much protein should I eat?”

This is a common question, and it seems that you always get different answers to it. On one hand, you’ll get recommendations from some sources that say you you only need around 50 grams per day, while some bodybuilding publications (essentially published by supplement companies) will recommend up to 300 grams per day, or even higher. Too much protein can be hard on the kidneys, and as a recent study shows, may not even help in gaining muscle. However, while eating more protein will make you feel full, it also won’t make you gain bodyfat.

You won’t even get a solid answer by looking into some of the peer-reviewed nutrition journals on a specific amount, because there is no fixed number that everyone needs. Throw in different variables and opinions such as the source of the protein and meal timing, and this number is pretty much a moving target.

Lots of people overthink this number, but I find that shooting for about one gram of protein per pound of lean body mass seems to be good enough for the majority of people, and for really lean people I just tell them to shoot for about a gram per pound of bodyweight. This seems to be within the ballpark of most sport nutrition recommendations for athletes. It may not be spot-on, but it is close enough. Until I get some super-definitive (and consistent) number from the sport nutrition world, this is where I’ll stay.

Some of the confusion comes from most sport nutrition journals using kilograms to measure body weight, while most of us in the United States are more familiar with measuring our weight in pounds. Guidelines for protein are from 1.3-2.0 grams per kilogram of bodyweight for athletes.

Hearing these numbers has probably confused a few people, who didn’t realize that a kilogram equals 2.2 pounds, and you fall right in line with some of the recommendations from bodybuilders to consumed 2 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight. And, I’m sure companies that sell protein supplements didn’t do anything to dissuade the decision to consume way more than is needed.

When it comes to performance and body composition goals, the big gains are really to be found in the variables of meal timing, especially in the areas of carbohydrate and fat consumption.

-Jim
www.idahokettlebells.com

October 26, 2010

Super Simple Nutrition Tips for Weight Loss:


Super Simple Nutrition Tips for Weight Loss:
Here are a few quick nutritional tips. I am a kettlebell strength and conditioning coach, kettlebell instructor and licensed fitness trainer, not a nutritionist.

These are just a few suggestions for those looking to lose weight through exercise. Any weight loss goal is at least 80% nutrition. You can’t out-train the dinner table.

I know there are other things that could be included, but these are a few that I know that people routinely struggle with. They are presented in no particular order.

You have to be accountable for everything that goes in your mouth.
Most people have no idea what “one serving” of anything is. I know I didn’t at one point. Studies have shown that people underestimate portion sizes by up to 40%. Whatever the actual amount of underestimation, the fact is you will de-rail your weight loss goals if you don’t measure everything accurately. This includes drinks. Drinking calories destroys a weight-loss goal. This includes alcohol. Alcohol is guaranteed to sabotage you.

Get a food scale and measure everything. Don’t make excuses.

“Too busy” is not acceptable.
I know that measuring, planning and accounting for every food and drink item takes time and effort, just like any other worthwhile accomplishment. Everyone has other commitments, such as work, family or school. You just have to find a way. Period.

Poor eating is usually a factor of poor planning.
Take time to plan your meals. I loosely follow The Warrior Diet, in which I starve myself most of the day, and then pig out at night. This is my personal choice, and I do not have a weight loss goal. This is not for everyone.

Plan your meals based around a lean protein source and some fruits and vegetables. This protein source could be as simple as whey protein mixed in water.

Along with poor planning, comes eating out. Let us just be safe and assume that everything you eat at a restaurant is horrible for you, even if it is presented as something healthy. This means you have to pack things with you. Go get a small cooler and get ready to pack things that do not need to be cooked.

Yes, once per week or so you can have a cheat meal that you indulge yourself with. This should only be once per week. Go ahead and plan your cheat meal and enjoy it!

If you can’t eat it raw, don’t eat it.
This obviously does not include meat, fish or eggs. You have to cook these things or you will get sick and die (or wish you did).

This includes things like any vegetable, nut or fruit. Eat only whole, raw nuts. No roasted nuts.

This doesn’t mean you can’t eat things that are cooked. It just means that you should be able to eat it raw if you had to. Take potatoes, for example: You could eat a raw potato. It would taste terrible, but it wouldn’t kill you.

No processed grains.
Consume nothing containing any form of wheat. No bread. No bagels. No pasta. None. These things are all horrible for you. Get your carbohydrates from things that grow straight from the ground, like vegetables and fruits.

Drink lots of water.Keep a water bottle near you at all times. Try to drink at least 3-4 litres of water per day. Everyday. Don’t be afraid to drink more.

Keep a food log that you can track portion sizes and calories consumed with.
This is extremely important. Write down everything you eat and the amount immediately. Don’t wait an hour or until the end of the day. Write it down as you eat it. You will forget otherwise, and you will take in more than you intend to.

-Jim
www.idahokettlebells.com

Powered by WordPress

All original content on these pages is fingerprinted and certified by Digiprove